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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Brent Goff
Anchor, DW News
KCSM 10/06/2015
Goff: On Tuesday, the European Court of Justice ruled that a 15-year-old agreement that regulates the safe transfer of data between EU nations and the U.S. is illegal. The message on the court -- European citizens cannot expect the same data protection rights they enjoy at home to be guaranteed by U.S. companies such as Facebook and Google. Now some say it is a ruling made possible by Edward Snowden's revelations. The law student that brought the case to court agrees. Mohr: The EU's top court ruled the safe harbor agreement between the U.S. and EU did not sufficiently guarantee the personal data of Europeans. It said tech companies cannot simply transfer data across the Atlantic.
Ariane Mohr
Reporter, DW News
KCSM 10/06/2015
Mohr: Data privacy advocates in Europe welcomed the ruling but the White House expressed concerns about its economic consequences. Earnest: We are aware of that ruling and while we are reviewing that ruling, we are disappointed the court has struck down an agreement that since 2000 has proved to be critical in protecting both privacy and fostering economic growth in the United States and European union. Mohr: 15 years ago, Brussels and Washington signed an agreement governing data transfers. But revelations made by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden in 2013 aroused suspicions that U.S. spy agencies gained access to massive troves of personal information. Jourova: The remaining thing that concerns our national security but we still have something to do there. Now after the court ruling, we have a very strong arguments in continuing the negotiations and achieving that results.
Ariane Mohr
Reporter, DW News
KCSM 10/06/2015
Mohr: Participants at the IT Security Fair now underway in Nuremberg also welcomed the ruling in Luxembourg. Trost: It was overdue. U.S. companies that store European user data in the U.S. have to protect that data. Developments in recent years have shown that they’re not doing that. Mohr: For most businesses in Europe, data security is a key priority, but it could take time for consumers to become more aware of potential security risks.
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